Update to a problematic placement decision

Two previous entries (here and here) addressed a problematic decision from the Fourth Circuit  arising out of Virginia.  The school district sought further review by the U.S. Supreme Court.  Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court denied further review.  The decision is now final, but not the ramifications.

Changes for Pennsylvania special education practice

Bold prediction: special education disputes will lead to more litigation. Perhaps it is not so bold, after all. But if Pennsylvania finalizes the proposed changes to Chapter 14 of the Education Regulations and removes the second level of administrative hearing appeal, I believe the legal practice will undergo some significant changes.

Delving into some generalizations, the second level appellate review has been viewed as a low cost second chance. Most cases (but not all) proceed to that level. But, I think, most cases stopped after two runs through administrative review. This is especially so if both levels of administrative review yielded the same essential result. Most courts, we tend to think, would not want to second-guess two levels of administrative review.  In playing for the best-out-of-three, if the hearing officer and the appeal panel came to quite different results, the case is more likely to get to court.  And, finally, in those cases offering very mixed relief after two reviews, the parties seem to realize they are better off taking matters in to their own hands and settling the claims.

While lawyers on both sides may have their gripes about the appeal panels, the process probably, perhaps in a perverse way, resulted in less cases going to court. So what might happen without that second level of review?

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Muslim attire and track suits: let religious belief run free

A multi-colored unitard running outfit is not what I usually think of when it comes to Muslim attire. But according to an Associated Press article in The Washington Post, a high school student was disqualified from a track event because her attire, a multi-colored unitard that complied with her Muslim beliefs, did not comply with competition rules. Note: according to the student, the unitard is not a performance-enhancing item.   

Although she had competed in other scholastic track events wearing the same outfit (and apparently with much success), officials at an invitational event in Montgomery County, Maryland found the outfit violated its rules. The outfit – a custom one-piece blue and orange unitard – covered her head, arms, torso and legs, overtop of which she wore her school’s uniform. Evidently, the unitard violated a rule against multi-colored uniforms and track officials offered to permit her to wear a white tee-shirt over the unitard covering the offending multiple colors. Track officials denied that the decision was based in any religious bias. 

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Glass houses and investigation of employment discrimination

Employee claims employer’s practices and or supervisors are discriminating. Employer investigates the claims and finds, not discrimination, but other facts showing conduct justifying termination. Did the employer retaliate? 

At least in the case below, the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals said no. Given that employer investigations are a necessary part of good employment practices, the ruling makes sense. But employers might consider making sure that policies and practices are clear regarding how the employer may use information uncovered in an investigation.

The employees, university police officers, in Nichols v. Southern Illinois University, --- F.3d ---, 2007 WL 4553649 (7th Cir.), claimed retaliation arising from the University’s investigation into their complaints of discrimination.

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Student transportation and constitutional rights

The case of Enright v. Springfield School District is a lesson in the important need for a quality program of training for bus drivers. The case resulted in a jury verdict upheld by the court against a school district and in favor of a seven year old student abused on a bus by older students. Liability against the school district was found because the school district did not train its driver and had policies and practices in place that made environment of the bus unsafe.

The school district owned and operated a bus that transported a 17-year old male student with emotional issues to an approved private school, a 14-year old male with learning disabilities to a private school, and a seven year old girl with Asperger’s syndrome to a private school. In short, the two boys engaged in sexualized conduct toward the girl that caused her significant trauma. Parents filed suit seeking relief via Section 1983 for violations of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans With Disabilities Act, the IDEA, and Fourteenth Amendment due process rights.

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No "core function" exception for Pennsylvania public CBA's

As 2007 came to an end, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court also put an end to the "core function" exception to labor arbitration decisions under the state’s Public Employee Relations Act. Westmoreland Inter. Unit No. 7 v. Westmoreland Inter. Unit No. 7 Classroom Ass’t Educ. Sup. Pers. Assoc. (majority opinion). The court did, however, find that a limited public policy exception can apply. But such public policy, said the court, “must be well-defined, dominant, and ascertained by reference to the laws and legal precedents and not from general considerations of supposed public interests.” 

The case involves finer legal points about how and to what degree courts are supposed to review labor arbitration decisions. But the facts are interesting, so we can start there.

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